2014 Candidates' Questionnaire Answers

Cascade publishes the questionnaire answers from all candidates who submit applications. Cascade publishes the answers in a given race only after Cascade has either endorsed a candidate or determined that it will not endorse in the race. For this reason, the answers of a candidate who has already applied may not be posted yet.

Endorsed? District Position Candidate Video List the specific bicycle infrastructure projects you would like to see built in your legislative district. Without increasing the existing transportation revenues or changing the transportation revenue mechanisms, what percentage do you support for bicycle and pedestrian projects within the next state transportation budget? What percentage do you support for bicycle and pedestrian projects within the next state transportation funding package? To increase funding for bicycle and pedestrian projects, where should the funding come from? Do you support increasing funding for the Safe Routes to School program? By how much? Do you support increasing funding for the Pedestrian/Bicycle Safety program? By how much? Do you support increasing funding for the Complete Streets program? By how much? If you would increase funding for these programs, where would the money come from? Do you support granting Sound Transit with the authority to take an ST3 ballot measure to voters? Would you support legislation that specifically grants Sound Transit the authority to use ST3 funds to build pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure to improve access to transit stations? Do you support strengthening the GMA’s transportation planning requirements and enforceability? How would you strengthen the GMA’s transportation planning requirements and enforceability?
Y
21
Senate Marko Liias # In the southern part of my district, the cities of Edmonds, Mountlake Terrace and Lynnwood are currently working to secure funding for bikes that will run all the way to the Edmonds waterfront and create both north-south and east-west corridors. The proposal would add 5.7 miles of bike land, almost doubling the existing bike network in the area. This project will go a long way in helping people to both protect the environment as well as enable them to live healthier lifestyles.
2%
10%
I support using gas tax revenues for bike and pedestrian projects.
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
The gas tax as well as other fees.
Y
Y
Y
I support giving the Department of Commerce review and authority for all comprehensive plans. Additionally, I support mandatory VMT reduction goals as part of regional planning.
Y
21
House, Pos. 2 Lillian Ortiz-Self # As a School Counselor who believes in a holistic approach for children and families I would like to see safe bike pathways for our families. This is good for their health, mental health, bonding, and to meet their transportation needs. Their are many areas in Edmonds and Mukilteo where there are no bike paths, or where it's choppy at best my neighborhood in Mukilteo for one. But I think I would have to say that I want to see safe bike paths built along communities that are within walking distance to schools. Many of our children want to bike to school but lack a safe pathway to do so.
2%
3%
I am willing to explore a variety of options including transportation revenues and taxes to closing tax loopholes and incentives.
Y
$5m
Y
$3m
Y
$3m
The above numbers are guesses on my part I do not have the transportation budget figures in front of me or the numbers indicating cost projections. So I am giving it my best guess without being unrealistic. Of course I would love to fully fund all of these projects but given our current funding issues I tried to give my best guess of a realistic figure without having those numbers in front of me. The answer to raising the money stands the same - exploring transportation taxes and revenues, project taxes, DOL taxes, vehicle registration etc, capital budget funds, federal dollars, and closing tax loop holes and incentives that are no longer needed.
Y
Y
Y
By ensuring it's existence and protecting its enforceability.
Y
23
House, Pos. 1 Sherry Appleton # Bainbridge Island is a leader in bike lanes, greenways, bike paths and bike parking in Kitsap County. I would like to see all the cities follow suit.
5%
5%
I believe it should be a consistent funding stream, whether a user fee (nominal) or out of the gas tax.
Y
$5m
Y
$5m
Y
$5m
Again from nominal user fees or from the gas tax so there would be a consistent revenue stream. Having said all that, I am not good at these allocations as I am not on Transportation, but agree this is important to reduce the carbon footprint.
Y
Y
Y
We should be enforcing concurrency and not give exemptions for projects just because a developer cries hardship.
Y
23
House, Pos. 2 Drew Hansen # I would like to see better bicycle access to/from the Bainbridge Island ferry terminal. Also, highway 305 on Bainbridge Island is a legendarily dangerous location for bicyclists (and also a main arterial for the community) and it could be a lot safer.
1%
1%
I don't have a strong sense of the appropriate percentages here, which is why I just left them at 1. I can be flexible on these percentages, but I would want to see sufficient support for communities that want to be bikeable and walkable to create those opportunities. I supported bike and pedestrian funding in the transportation revenue package.
Y
-
Y
-
Y
-
I wrote "zero" only because I don't have a hard sense for where these numbers should end up. Again, I supported the transportation revenue package, which would have raised considerable new revenue for all transportation options, including bike and pedestrian, and I would expect these to be priorities in any future revenue package.
Y
Y
Y
I am not on any of the committees with oversight over the GMA; I would defer to people like Rep. Fitzgibbon who are much more well-versed in GMA than I am.
Y
25
House, Pos. 2 Hans Zeiger # 1. Link Riverwalk to East Puyallup Trailhead of Foothills Trail via Knutson/Van Lierop farms

2. Link Fife trails to Puyallup Riverwalk
2.5%
2.5%
- State transportation funding package

- Local option revenues

- Capital Budget competitive grants
Y
$20m
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
State transportation funding package
Y
Y
N
While I am a believer in GMA, I am also a strong champion for road infrastructure such as the completion of Highway 167 and don't want to commit myself to a specific policy program related to GMA changes without considering all of the pros and cons.
Y
26
House, Pos. 2 Larry Seaquist # 3 big ones for me:

1. Personal use -- extend Foothills trail on east from South Prairie

2. Personal use -- extend Cushman trail north and on to Key Peninsula

3. Regional--legislative action: I'm working with all West Sound governments (mayors, counties and planning organizations) to build a new, comprehensive West Sound Transportation plan with the goal of capturing major funding in the event of a transportation package. Included would explicitly be the Sinclair Inlet connector so commuters and recreational bike riders could safely get through Gorst on Hwy. 16/3.
2%
2%
There is no fixed percentage. Clearly it needs to be above 1% -- but we need to put forth a specific set of concrete proposals and compete them against other priorities.
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
 
Y
Y
Y
By helping you organize advocacy at the county level.
Y
27
House, Pos. 1 Laurie Jinkins # We have spent too many generations of urban infrastructure planning relegating non-motorized transit to the back burner. Communities that emphasize biking and walking are universally more vibrant, livable and desirable. They also foster a strong business community and a sense of connection to one’s neighborhood. I’m highly supportive of the bike lanes and accessible sidewalks being built throughout Tacoma, I’ve supported my employer (Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department) in making it easier for people to bike to work by assuring we have appropriate bike storage and locker rooms.
10%
10%
I’m not supportive of starting out with percentage requirements (some people have been trying to get us to do this in human services & education). I’m supportive of identifying the things we want to fund, then funding them.

When making the cost-benefits decisions on infrastructure, we must consider the secondary benefits associated with non-motorized transit. In many cases, this may mean moving money geared toward automobile roads to projects that emphasize livable communities. The Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department championed complete streets. These resolutions were developed at TPCHD and we were pleased that the City of Tacoma and a few other local governments have adopted them and are using them to guide some of their transportation decisions. While we haven’t yet been successful, I’ve worked to try and move complete streets forward at a state level. At the state level, we ought to devote increasing amounts of the transportation to non-motorized and mass transportation strategies.
Y
$1m
Y
$1m
Y
$1m
I’m not supportive of starting out with fixed amount requirements. Again, I’m supportive of identifying the things we want to fund, then funding them.

We can and should make sidewalks and roads safe for children to travel, but they will not be used if families don’t feel that their community is safe from crime. So, we must take a comprehensive approach as we work on our safe routes strategies. As with many of the questions you ask, I’ve worked a lot on this topic in my other job at the health department.

I believe that in order to secure funding for non-mandated programs we need a tax system that is fair, adequate and stable. Washington State's current tax base relies too heavily on regressive, unreliable taxes, and I have been a leader in promoting systemic reform. Closing loopholes, and adding new revenue streams that more equitably distribute the costs of our shared investments will help us fund necessary services. I am convinced that it will take committed legislators and citizens some time to replace our regressive system with a progressive tax system, however, I am passionate about seeing true revenue reform through so that we can fully fund bicycle safety programs and more.

I support increasing revenue so that we have the means to prioritize these important safety programs. One of the struggles we face is that many of these programs can legally be funded with 18th amendment (transportation) dollars and, thus, would likely be ineligible for state general fund funding. I will absolutely advocate for carving out funding for complete streets, main streets and other non-motorized transportation as we push forward our next transportation funding package.

We could authorize local governments to enact a vehicle license fee, motor-vehicle excise fee, tax on CO2 emissions or other funding mechanisms to raise money for public transportation. Frankly, we need a complete overhaul of our revenue systems.
Y
Y
Y
I tend to be a data driven person. I think that the data speaks for itself, but must be combined with evidence that urban density can work successfully with affordability. I’m not very well versed in this area but am open to ideas and discussion.
Y
27
House, Pos. 2 Jake Fey # - Prairie Line Trail

- Completion of Dome to Pt. Defiance

-Water Ditch Trail

-Extensions to the Scott Pearson Trail
15%
15%
Increases in the gas tax or institution of a vehicle miles traveled tax.
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
Y
$5m
Increase in gas tax.
Y
Y
Y
By withholding other transportation dollars.
Y
32
Senate Maralyn Chase # I would like to see protected bike lanes and neighborhood greenways. throughout the district but suggest that they be wide enough for seniors on trikes. Three wheeled bikes are wonderful for seniors but we need a little more space.

And I like the large white bike symbols on the roadways that let car drivers know we are possibly on the same road. In areas of heavy bike use in "crosswalks" which are for me "cross-bikes" I think we need more warning for cars. Drivers simply are not aware that bike riders could be in the crosswalks and just don't see us. They see walkers, usually, just not bikes.
10%
10%
A carbon tax. Do I think we will be successful in reaching 10% or in instituting a carbon tax in the legislature? Perhaps not. But I think we need to make a serious attempt to educate legislators about the impact of bike riders. Climate Change is real and getting people out of their cars and onto bikes must be made more attractive.

But I think the people -- the voters are fed up with business as usual and I think we will need to go to the voters.
Y
$5m
Y
$5m
Y
$5m
I would like to increase the funding for all these programs. However, I think the McCleary Decision will be taking all the money we have for everything else. And, we are going to have to raise taxes. I prefer an income tax, not a sales tax or an increase in the gas taxes for these programs. Perhaps we are going to have a state bike license. Nothing will be left unexamined.
Y
Y
Y
I am open to suggestions. I do not serve on the Transportation Committee or the Local Government Committee so they may have ideas that I do not know about.

I am very concerned that local municipalities will be given unfunded mandates. Local municipalities have little option but to increase the already regressive nature of their utility tax system. This is not an acceptable solution. Keep in mind we have the most regressive tax system in the United States.
Y
33
House, Pos. 2 Mia Gregerson # Complete the lake to sound train (regional), expanding more safe routes to school especially in Highline School District area, figure out how to get a bike share program in south king county
5%
5%
Gas tax, MVET, and tolling are all possibilities
Y
$25m
Y
$25m
Y
$25m
It is up to the direction of the committee and members.
Y
Y
Y
I would allocate funding to projects that were able to provide abilities above and beyond existing GMA requirements
Y
34
House, Pos. 2 Joe Fitzgibbon # I would like to see safety improvements to the West Seattle Bridge bike trail, a bike lane and safer sidewalks on SW 136th St and S 136th St, a separated bike/pedestrian path on 8th Ave S, a neighborhood greenway on Delridge, and a safe traffic signal at the intersection of 47th Ave SW & SW Admiral Way, for starters.
10%
25%
I support increasing the gas tax to fund bike/ped projects. The Supreme Court's 2013 decision in AUTO v. State of Washington makes it clear that new gas tax revenues can be used for non-highway purposes, in contrast to the traditional strict interpretation of the 18th Amendment. Other options include a motor vehicle excise tax and tolls, but I prefer a gas tax because of its direct correlation with carbon emissions.
Y
$25m
Y
$25m
Y
 
As stated earlier, gas tax is my preferred revenue stream to pay for transportation projects.
Y
Y
Y
Protecting and improving the Growth Management Act has been one of the focuses of my legislative work. I support requiring local comprehensive plans and regional transportation plans to achieve the state's vehicle miles traveled and greenhouse gas reduction goals, requiring local comprehensive plans to be consistent with regional transportation plans, and introduced legislation effecting these changes (HB 2804). I also believe that the legal framework already exists to require that local and regional transportation plans meet the state's VMT and GHG goals, because the state transportation plan is required to meet them and local and regional plans are supposed to be consistent with the state plan. I have met several times with WSDOT to encourage them to update the state transportation plan in compliance with RCW 70.235.020 and RCW 47.01440.
Y
36
Senate Jeanne Kohl-Welles # All.
3%
5%
We need to pass what was included in the House transportation revenue package raise that passed the House but died in the Senate, e.g., increased gas taxes, as well as car tabs, and authority for local option revenue.
Y
$5m
Y
$10m
Y
$10m
Although I responded to the above questions, I honestly do not know the appropriate amounts for the above nor where the funds would come from other than through increasing funding for the state transportation budget for these programs as well as for the multi-modal account. I have advocated for this for years, including introducing legislation and offering amendments on the Senate floor.
Y
Y
Y
I believe we need to require rather than allow multimodal improvements with concomitant penalties for lack of or inadequate compliance.
Y
37
Senate Pramila Jayapal # We must invest in our transit infrastructure and pass a progressive transportation package that funds a system that is forward thinking and prioritizes modes of transport other than single-occupancy vehicles.

I am very supportive of Seattle’s Central Area Neighborhood Greenway connecting the I-90 trail to Interlaken Park that goes through the Central District. Once this project is completed, cyclists will be able to go all the way from Interlaken Park north of Capitol Hill to Georgetown through many different neighborhoods. Networks that connect with each other and allow cyclists to utilize transit are the types of projects I will advocate for in Olympia.
5%
5%
I intend to fully support full funding of transit, bike and pedestrian projects in Olympia. This will require a lot of coalition building and I intend to make that happen. The state should take the lead with its transportation package and adequately fund investments and improvements. Localities should also be allowed to supplement the state package as they see fit, this could be through a transportation benefit district, but we must prevent the situations when local authorities feel it is their only option to “go it alone” because of a lack of state support.
Y
$100m
Y
$225m
Y
$175m
I fully support all of these programs and believe they should be funded through the state transportation package. My amounts listed above reflect an investment of about 5% in a $10 billion transportation package. This would be a substantial increase in funding but I believe these programs are worth our state investment and have proven themselves to be very beneficial.
Y
Y
Y
The Puget Sound is an ecological powerhouse of a region and I want to be a leader on environmental protection in our State Senate. I support strengthening the GMA’s transportation planning requirements that localities must meet. The state should set stricter standards for comprehensive plans and realistic deadlines for meeting them. Our transportation networks connect our communities and it is important that we act regionally when strengthening the GMA.
Y
38
House, Pos. 1 June Robinson # We need to continue to build out bicycle infrastructure in the 38th District. Particularly, protected bike lanes need to be increased and improved so that they connect with one another. Bike paths are very popular and need to be improve and increased. Additional bike lockers at transit hubs are needed, as is bike parking throughout the cities and strategic locations in the district.
5%
5%
Funding for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure can and should come from a number of sources -- state operating, capital and transportation budgets, as well as city and county budgets.
Y
$5m
Y
$5m
Y
$20m
Again, I believe that the funding for these programs should come from the state capital, operating and transportation budgets. There is a direct connection to all three budgets with these programs.
Y
Y
Y
Planning requirements can be tied to transportation funding to improve their functionality and to make sure they are enforced.
Y
41
House, Pos. 1 Tana Senn Video Step number one is making sure that bicycle infrastructure is safe for all ages. We need protected bike lanes and paths so that everyone can feel safe while riding. Parents should not have to worry when they let their children ride to school, or to the corner store. I got involved with Mercer Island politics when I was uncomfortable walking or biking with my kids to school. As a Councilmember, I have been a consistent advocate for Safe Routes to School and additional bike and pedestrian paths.

With voters approving an extension on light link rail to connect the cities of Bellevue, Mercer Island, Redmond and Seattle, we are presented with a great opportunity to integrate safe bicycle and pedestrian facilities into the new stations. This would make the stations more accessible and allow commuters more options when taking light rail.

I'm also focused on completing the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trail between Factoria Boulevard and 150th Ave. Our natural amenities make this region a spectacular place to live. They are part of the fabric of our community, and people should have access to them.
1%
1%
The larger, cross-community projects along our highways should be paid for by the state transportation budget. For more local projects, funds can come from local government and potentially the Capital Budget.
Y
-
Y
-
Y
-
I am happy to see an increase in revenue for important infrastructure projects, which are an investment in our communities, economy and state. Funding through the gas tax and vehicle miles traveled is the approach I’d like to see.

I will look to the Cascade Bicycle Club for a recommendation on how much additional money is needed.
Y
Y
Y
I agree with the PSRC Vision 2040 statement that "Level-of- Service standards should focus on the movement of people and goods, not just the movement of vehicles". With more residents living in urban settings and driving less, establishing LOS standards for alternative modes of travel is just smart policy. This would facilitate development in our urban areas by updating outdated regulations. I am open to incorporating sufficient bicycle and pedestrian standards and would appreciate Cascade Bicycle Club's input on this issue.
Y
43
Senate Jamie Pedersen # I'm working hard on getting full funding for the SR 520 Madison Park to I-5 project, which includes a critical new bike connection. I would also love to see funding of additional greenways, such as Capitol Hill and Wallingford.
5%
5%
As with SR 520, every significant project should incorporate funding for bike/ped projects. I am happy to support various funding sources, including increased gas taxes; a renewed MVET; system tolling; etc.
Y
$25m
Y
$10m
Y
$25m
See previous response: MVET, system tolling, carbon tax, etc.
Y
Y
Y
This is not an area I have worked on, but I am open to suggestions. Requiring sidewalks and bike infrastructure in all new developments?
Y
43
House, Pos. 2 Frank Chopp # I support several of the proposed projects in the Bicycle Master Plan for Seattle, including more dedicated and protected bike lanes throughout Seattle neighborhoods, including downtown. Our legislative district has a large bike-riding population, contains a major part of the Burke Gilman Trail, and has many greenways already completed with more on the way. We should expand our infrastructure for active transit to improve public health, ensure bicycle safety, and reduce traffic congestion in Seattle.
4%
5%
During the 2013 legislative session, I helped lead the way in the House, passing a transportation revenue package with a significant increase in funding for pedestrian and bike infrastructure, from less that one percent up to about 3.5%. Senate Republicans refused to vote on any revenue package. The action by the House was a step in the right direction, but we need to do more for bike riders and pedestrians. I will continue to work with legislators to make sure that we do this.
Y
$60m
Y
$140m
Y
$110m
These numbers are approximately the amounts we attempted to add to these programs in the 2013 transportation revenue package, approved by the House Democrats but blocked by the Senate Republicans. Personally, I support more funding in each of these categories. Funding revenue should include gas taxes, vehicle weight fees, motor vehicle excise taxes, and other progressive sources. Please let me know your specific points of view.
Y
Y
Y
The GMA needs to address a comprehensive array of issues, including how concerns like transportation are connected with public health. By requiring dedicated bike and pedestrian pathways, we not only can alleviate traffic congestion, but also improve the health of the community. This would save health care dollars and save lives. I support strengthening both financial incentives and penalties to encourage local governments to move towards this approach, as part of the GMA.
Y
45
House, Pos. 2 Hans Dunshee # Connection to south trails from Snohomish Centennial Trail. I can wish for protected bike lanes. A foot of space outside the white line on semi-rural roads.
15%
15%
Flexible but it's pavement so it could be gas tax eligible.
Y
-
Y
-
Y
-
Impossible to know amount or source until a budget is built.
Y
Y
Y
Strengthen concurrency.
Y
46
Senate David Frockt # - Northgate Pedestrian Bridge - which I would hope would have access for bicycles.

- Continued maintenance and upkeep of the Burke Gilman trail.

- I am open to dedicated bike lanes as set forth in the Seattle Master Plan from a few years ago and was a prime co-sponsor of the statewide Complete Streets Bill that passed in 2011. I fought hard for funding Complete Streets in the doomed transportation package this year.
5%
5%
I think under the Automobile Insurance case there can be non-road transportation projects funded out of fuel tax sources if necessary. I have supported all of the options available under local TBD authorities for transit and other non-road purposes like bike-ped.
Y
$100m
Y
$40m
Y
$200m
See the previous answer.
Y
Y
Y
Let's work together on a possible statutory strategy or an amendment...
Y
46
House, Pos. 1 Jessyn Farrell # My priorities for the 46th District include:

• Expanding our district’s Safe Routes to School program

• Improving pedestrian infrastructure—too many of our neighborhoods lack sidewalks, safe crosswalks and clear pedestrian signage

• Bicycle infrastructure—adding bike lanes and safe bike routes to increase access to the Burke Gilman, new transit stations and job centers

• Holding the line on (and increasing!) public transportation funding and access, which so many families rely on to get to work and school
10%
25%
We need to fundamentally reform our transportation funding, moving away from the gas tax which is constitutionally tied to roads spending, to other funding sources that would be dedicated to funding non-motorized and transit-related investments. I support a variety of approaches including a sales tax on gas, a vehicle-miles traveled fee, reinstituting the statewide MVET (and improving the valuation mechanisms), and toll revenue.
Y
$50m
Y
$50m
Y
$50m
As stated above, I support a variety of approaches including a sales tax on gas, a vehicle-miles traveled fee, reinstituting the statewide MVET, and toll revenue.
Y
Y
Y
My professional career of the last decade has been devoted to ensuring our cities and counties are livable and people-oriented; a task that could not be done without the GMA. At WashPIRG and at Transportation Choices Coalition I spearheaded a number of successful policy efforts to improve local and state planning. Most notably, we reformed state transportation planning guidelines to change the measure of success for a transportation project from how focusing on the movement of single-occupancy vehicles, which necessarily results in wide, multi-lane roads and highways, to focusing on the movement of people and goods, which results in the use of a variety of transportation tools like transit, sidewalks, and bike paths to get people around.

As a legislator, I have continued to take a systemic approach to land use and transportation to ensure we’re improving our environment, reducing CO2 emissions, supporting economic growth in urban areas, and enhancing our quality of life. For example, I sponsored a proviso in the ’13-15 biennial budget to require WSDOT to develop a “reduced VMT” scenario for all new corridor plans.
Y
46
House, Pos. 2 Gerry Pollet # 1. I have been a leading voice working for a bicycle and pedestrian bridge over I-5 connecting the Northgate Transit Station to North Seattle College. In addition to enabling thousands of residents from west of I-5 to bike or walk to the transit center, the bridge would provide easy access for students, staff and thousands of people going to North for state social and employment services at the Opportunity Center. I have succeeded in placing funding for the project in the House transportation revenue package, as well as lobbying City Council Members to commit to a City share of funding. This would decrease the claimed need for a massive parking garage providing free parking for transit center users.

2. There is a dire need to connect the Burke Gilman train with an overpass over Highway 522 to Kenmore town center and transit center at the North end of Lake Washington.

3. Greenways with bike paths and sidewalks to connect safe routes to schools throughout NE and N Seattle, including to the reopening Cedar Park Elementary, John Rodgers Elementary, and other schools. I have supported the NE 65th bike track to Magnuson Park which is now open and a great improvement for safety.
5%
5%
Given that the rate of non-car commute significantly exceeds ten percent in our Seattle metro area and 4.5% statewide; and, the fact that transit, bicycles and walking reduce all congestion and demand for additional roadways, I believe that a minimum of ten percent of transportation dollars should be allocated to these alternatives. I oppose limitations on the gas tax for roads, and believe that the interpretation of that limit is out of date.

I believe investments in separate bike lane lights, curbing and lane alignments for bicycles improve safety and traffic flow for ALL users of our roads, and that investments in these efforts should be a significant part of all traffic and roadway expenditures. We no longer question the slight additional cost of making sidewalk curb cuts accessible for handicapped persons – and, the day is not far off when we will have broad acceptance of investments for safe bicycling.

A ten percent investment pays off in reduced total capital for roads, especially when we factor in the life-cycle costs, such as the cost of increased stormwater, and the need to capture and treat runoff from roads.

I am a strong advocate for increasing revenues and making our tax system more fair and stable – which is important for alternative transportation modes and our environment.

I am a strong supporter of our state adopting a carbon tax which would enable us to devote a portion of revenues to transit, bicycle and pedestrian investments which further reduce carbon emissions as well as the environmental damage from contaminated storm water runoff and other emissions. Under a cap and trade proposal, I will advocate for similar funding.
Y
$100m
Y
5% of transpo. budget
Y
$100m
A WSDOT study found that additional community input under Complete Streets programs would have saved 30% of project cost on a significant number of projects. This is a good investment!

Safe Routes to schools should be funded as part of our commitment to basic education and our commitment to increase school transportation funding pursuant to our constitutional mandate. A child who can’t get to school safely is a child who can’t learn.

I am a strong advocate for local option MVET and gas tax increases for transit – without requiring public votes for county and city councils to adopt.

For all of the programs discussed in the questionnaire, I will continue to advocate for a total of ten percent of transportation budgets and new revenue packages to be devoted to transit, bicycle and pedestrian routes and safety. It is time to increase our gas tax for a new revenue package that meets this goal and eliminate the restriction on use of gas taxes for road projects.

When we drafted the GMA, we gave cities the authority to charge development impact fees and mitigation fees for transit service. Ironically, in Seattle, this tool has not been utilized, despite success in other communities. I will reintroduce legislation to require consideration under SEPA of the impacts of large developments on the ability of transit agencies to meet transit service standards, and require that mitigation be used to meet those standards. Thus, if a mall expansion will generate thousands of additional transit trips, reducing the ability of the transit agency to meet service standards, the local city or county would have to require mitigation to increase transit service, which may include development impact fees to pay for service.
Y
Y
Y
As noted above, I believe that we need to concurrently strengthen SEPA and GMA in requiring consideration of goals for reducing carbon, meeting transit service standards, and increasing health and safety.

We should require consideration of health in transportation projects – adding health to our state transportation goals – and ensure consideration under our State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) of the health impacts of transportation investments along with reasonable alternatives. I am an advocate for the definition of reasonable alternatives always including transit and nonmotorized transportation, and reducing the footprint and impacts of road projects with a set aside for transit bikes and pedestrians.

I introduced legislation in 2012, which would require cities and counties to consider the impacts on transit service standards from large developments, and enable use of mitigation and impact fees to fund increased transit service. I will continue to work to ensure that review of major impacts includes impacts to transit service standards, with required mitigation – including use of developer impact fees.
Y
48
Senate Cyrus Habib # I am eager to see bicycle infrastructure, most importantly that which allows safe commuting for bicyclists like bike lanes and paths, increased in my district. Young professionals commuting in the 48th have made clear their need for a district which is walkable and bicycle friendly, and laying the foundations to meet this goal should begin with safe lanes for daily bicycle commuters.
3%
5%
We need to redirect our focus from funding projects that favor and encourage single-occupancy vehicle commuting towards more sustainable commuter options.
Y
$50m
Y
$50m
Y
$45m
Where funding can be allocated from depends greatly on the budget year to year, however some funding from tolling and other transportation fees can be used.
Y
Y
Y
I am a huge supporter of building density and developing more efficient public transit options. Planning our city infrastructure moving forward with the goal of increasing walkability and non-car commuting is a tangible step towards encouraging a decreasing reliance on single-occupancy vehicles. I am committed to working toward sustainable transit options for the Eastside and I will rely on the expertise of groups like Cascade for input on how bicycling infrastructure can contribute to our goal of more sustainable commuting habits.
Y
48
House, Pos. 1 Ross Hunter # We need to finish the 520 path in a way that works for commuters. I expect it to be a major throughway for Microsoft and other Eastside tech workers to get home to Seattle, and for Eastsiders to get to work in Seattle. I remain concerned about the stretch between Bellevue Way and the existing 520 trail going east.

I'd like to see a connection between Woodinville and Redmond that didn't involve the Sammamish River Trail. It's dangerous to ride fast with all the kids and swaying rollerbladers. Willows has a hill problem north of 124th.

The Soos Creek trail needs to be continued to get closer to the central Puget Sound. It's a cool trail and nice to ride on, but too short.

The East Lake Sammamish trail needs paving in the middle section, but the city of Sammamish has been pretty reluctant. I heard a rumor it would be finished this summer, which would make that lake circuit much nicer.
5%
10%
Gas tax to raise funds for road construction, including some bike/ped stuff.

Tolling in the entire Puget Sound "box" around Lake Washington including I-90, I-5, and 405. Failing this we are hard put to finish projects in Puget Sound. This money should be controlled by the region.
Y
$50m
Y
$50m
Y
$50m
I have no idea how big these should be - it depends on the size of the overall package. Some can come from gas tax, some from tolling, some from car tabs or other fees.
Y
Y
Y
This is not my area of expertise. I'm open to hearing suggestions from Cascade, Transportation Choices and other groups with appropriate expertise. We clearly need to require cities to require more density around incredibly expensive rail stations, despite the pushback they get from neighborhood groups.
Y
48
House, Pos. 2 Joan McBride # There are two important projects that I am eager to see through to fruition. The first is the completion of the 520 bike path portion along Northup Way. There is a small portion where the bike path will have to be co-located with road traffic. The second is the planning and implementation of the Eastside Rail Corridor with designated bike and pedestrian pathways. The huge demand for bike commuting means we must have a designated pathway.

I would like to help our cities on the Eastside to embrace the notion of ‘complete streets’. While the Eastside cities are committed to complete streets, it is more of a first-generation approach to complete streets, allowing for all modes instead of welcoming them. I would love to see that change. I want to see safe, wide designated bike lanes that recognize biking as not just a viable form of transportation but as a commended mode.

I would also like to see the Bike Shares Program come to the Eastside as soon as possible. It will be interesting to see how the program does in Seattle.

I was a huge proponent of the three foot passing rule and would like to see that as a foundational piece for other bike safety legislation.
5
7
One option we can consider is a local transportation benefit district (TBD). I expect next year’s transportation bill will include a $40 local option – it could or should include the ability to use a portion of the TBD for bike and pedestrian projects.

Any transportation ballot measures must include robust funding for bike/ped projects. These are popular projects with the citizenry and I believe would help the measure to pass. Another option is to make sure that transit operations and projects include bike and ped.

Funding for bike and ped projects needs to be, at the very least, restored to pre-recession levels. We must also find a way to provide funding for ‘complete streets’ programs across the state.
Y
NA
Y
NA
Y
NA
I don’t have an answer for how much to increase the budget for Safe Routes to Schools, Bike/Ped Safety, and Complete Streets. However, Safe Routes and Bike/Ped Safety – programs that existed before the recession—must be brought back to pre-recession funding as soon as possible. I believe the Complete Streets legislation happened just after the start of the recession so there is not a base line for funding.

All three of these programs should be seen as integral to a state transportation package and be allocated funds. These are not nice-to-have programs—they are critical to our public welfare and safety. They protect our neighborhoods and businesses, specifically protect the vulnerable, and acknowledge that all modes are necessary for a vibrant and safe urban setting.
Y
Y
Y
The transportation sections of comprehensive plans should have mandatory sections regarding mode shifts and how those goals will be reached. Transit oriented development should be mandated within a quarter- to a half-mile of transit centers and we should make a new commitment to send resources to our urban designated centers that are willing to embrace truly transit oriented development. Also, we should incorporate the vision from PSRC’s Growing Transit Communities into comprehensive plans in our most urban areas. Enforceability could come in several forms. For example, it could be through legislation that gives the Growth Management Hearings Board more guidance or it could be in legislation that mandates more robust targets for comprehensive plans.
#
#
# # # #
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#